Posts

Showing posts from October 4, 2020

Charlie Chaplin: Let Us Free The World

Image
Some call it the greatest speech ever made. This remix puts Charlie Chaplin's climactic address from "The Great Dictator" (1940) into present-day context, showing how the spirit of liberty, brotherhood, and equality that defeated fascism seven decades ago must be urgently reclaimed.
Watch Video

How Narcissistic Leaders Make Organizations Less Ethical

Image
A narcissist's bad behavior infects their organizational culture even after they're gone.

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all? The answer: not the organizations led by narcissists.

By Mickey Butts A new paper by Berkeley Haas School of Business professor Jennifer Chatman and her colleagues shows not only the profound impact narcissistic leaders have on their organizations, but also the long-lasting damage they inflict. Like carriers of a virus, narcissistic leaders “infect” the very cultures of their organizations, the researchers found, leading to dramatically lower levels of collaboration and integrity at all levels—even after they are gone.

The paper, “When ‘Me’ Trumps ‘We’: Narcissistic Leaders and the Cultures They Create,” published in The Academy of Management Discoveries, is coauthored by Charles A. O’Reilly of Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and Bernadette Doerr.

In previous research about toxic leaders, Chatman and her …

How the Printing Press Can Help Us Live Better in the Digital Era!

Image
Why do people flock to a remote farm in Vermont to witness an art form that’s centuries-old? Well, perhaps it has something to do with reminding us all to reconnect to the slow, meaningful moments in life! Pause for a moment and join us for this wonder.

In a little print shop on a farm in middle-of-nowhere Vermont, something magical is afoot. One by one, tiny letters are assembled to tell a tale of tradition that in our world of inkjet printers and digital media, is often forgotten. What draws people to this remote place? It’s an epicenter of wonder and magic that’ll have you itching to go yourself.

By Liesl Ulrich-Verderber

Read Article

Is Philanthropy Really Changing Anything?

Image
"What does philanthropy in India look like today, and what has it managed to do? Is it really changing the world and people's lives? Or is it simply an extension of capitalism and an opportunity for the super-rich to strengthen their stranglehold on economic activity as well as development and social progress?"This article shares thoughts on what philanthropists can do to ensure greater alignment with society's needs.
Read Article

Deo Niyizonkiza: Healing What Remains

Image
"A young man arrives in the Big City with two hundred dollars in his pocket, no English at all, and memories of horror so fresh that he sometimes confuses past and present. When Deo first told me about his beginnings in New York, I had a simple thought: "I would not have survived." And then, two years later, he enrolls in an Ivy League university." In his bestselling book, 'Strength in What Remains' Tracy Kidder shares more about Deo -- who survived civil war in Burundi, narrowly escaped genocide in Rwanda, and is now the founder and director of a world-class, community-driven medical clinic in his native country. Read an excerpt from Kidder's book here.
Read Article

How to Keep Connecting with Strangers During the Pandemic

Image
Fleeting, everyday social interactions matter for our well-being, research suggests.

I love my husband and my son. But I never expected that they would be practically my only companions for seven months in a row. 

Since COVID hit, we’ve been cooped up at home together, barely going out of the house except for groceries and exercise. I’ve not hugged another person besides them; I’ve barely even seen other people, actually, except for a few close friends.

By Jill Suttie  Though I appreciate that I’m not living alone, as others are during this pandemic, I’m still getting tired of the claustrophobic feeling of only interacting with the same two people day after day. I miss freedom of movement and the people I’d bump into—the woman who manages my office building, the counter-person at my favorite lunch place, and even just smiling strangers I once passed on the street. It feels like a loss—and research suggests that it really is, for many of us.

Those small, passing social i…

How We Predicted the Walk on the Moon, Cell Phones, and Siri!

Image
For centuries now we have had a way of looking into—and even shaping—the future. But how is this possible? Well, some of our favorite movies and television shows are already giving us a glimpse into what life may look like in tomorrow’s tomorrow! Ready to take a peek?

Did you know that since the 19th century, we’ve had a way of predicting the future!? This popular innovation has predicted the walk on the moon, cell phones, and even Alexa. So, how is this all possible? And can you and I harness it?

By Liesl Ulrich-Verderber
Read Article

Embracing Groundlessness

Image
"It's a fundamental fact of human life that we want our lives to be under control -- we develop plans, goals, routines, systems, tools, schedules, structure to our lives. But while developing some structure is a very helpful thing for most of us ... the truth is, there's so much that we don't control. Life is chaotic, out of control, shaky. It's what Pema Chodron calls "groundlessness" -- the feeling of no solid ground under our feet." Leo Babauta shares more in this post.
Read Article

An Unknown World: Notes on the Meaning of the Earth

Image
In 1926 Vladimir Vernadsky's pioneering book The Biosphere showed for the first time that the biosphere of the earth was an integral dynamic system controlled by life itself. The biosphere "receives from every part of celestial space an infinite number of other radiations... We have hardly begun to realize their fundamental importance in surrounding processes, an importance scarcely perceptible to our minds so accustomed to other pictures of the universe. These rays are being incessantly propagated around us, within us, everywhere..." As Jacob Needleman writes, "Why did these words of Vernadsky now, as before, send a chill down my spine?"He further pondered, "What was the sensibility of this pioneering Russian scientist that enabled him to offer straightforward information in a way that opened the heart even as it informed the mind? The text was touching something entirely different in me--and not only in me, but also in each one of the men an…

What Are We Grateful for During COVID-19?

Image
A journey through expressions of gratitude during the pandemic reveals how we're helping each other through it.

In many places around the world, the COVID-19 pandemic means perpetually living under the gun. When we walk out of our doors, we can’t let our guard down. Even grocery shopping can feel fraught with danger. Moreover, many people fear for their jobs and futures. This has also been a period of intense political conflict in the United States and of fires up and down the West Coast. Seeing threats everywhere triggers stress and anxiety.

By Emiliana R. Simon-Thomas, Jeremy Adam Smith
Read Article

Meet the Ancient Superheroes Fighting Cancer, PTSD, Pollution, and Saving the Bees!

Image
What if everything we need to solve many of our most vexing problems is growing, silently, all around us? Mushrooms are an unexplored powerhouse that could very well save the world!

Could one readily available ancient organism treat PTSD, reduce methane gas, create stylish clothes, produce tasty food, and cut down on the harmful chemicals leaching into the environment? Well, this is not a pipe dream: researchers are finding that mushrooms can help us live better lives in so many ways. Here’s what you need to know!

By Sam Burns

Read Article

Meeting Our Pain With Compassion

Image
"I'd like to explore the essential place of compassion in our lives in a very simple way. As human beings we have a conscious awareness that is open to what is. Our very nature is openness. On a feeling level this openness shows up as sensitivity, tenderness, rawness, as an exquisite receptivity and responsiveness. As a consequence of this delicacy, we are also easily hurt. Its like the softness of our skin--which is easily bruised, yet allows us to experience a wide range of subtle textures and temperatures." John Welwood shares more in this short essay on self compassion.
SELF-COMPASSION I’d like to explore the essential place of compassion in our lives in a very simple way. As human beings we have a conscious awareness that is open to what is. Our
very nature is openness. On a feeling level this openness shows up as sensitivity, tenderness, rawness, as an exquisite receptivity and responsiveness. As a consequence of this delicacy, we are also …

Zen TV

Image
"How many of you know how to watch television?" I asked my class one day. After a few bewildered and silent moments, slowly, one by one, everyone haltingly raised their hands. We soon acknowledged that we were all 'experts,' as Harold Garfinkle would say, in the practice of 'watching television.'This short excerpt by Bernard McGrane provides a profound thought experiment that can help us "wake up" to what might be really going on when we turn on the television.
Read Article