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Showing posts from March 8, 2020

Here’s How to Find Meaning in Your Midlife Crisis

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Middle age can be a time of renewal, if you're willing to ask the right questions. By Michael F. Steger I’m still having my midlife crisis, I think. It started when I one day realized that I had unconsciously imagined that my mid-20s self would simply grow into a middle-aged person who had nicer clothes, but would still go to gallery openings, weird theater shows, and feedback-drenched indie rock shows at dive bars. On top of that, I’d finally be able to speak and understand French. That’s what I had imagined. What is today’s reality? I answer emails 31 hours a day. The highlight of my personal edification is wandering into Trader Joe’s to uncover what kooky new thing they’ve infused with pumpkin. My mid-20s self would mutter “as if” at my precautions to make sure I don’t drink coffee after noon. I now carefully consider the health implications of shoveling snow too enthusiastically. Hopefully you’re as bored with my midlife crisis as my family and friends are. If you

Mr. Gluck and the Not-So-Secret Secret to Creating a Legacy that Lasts!

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What’s the secret to getting through some of life’s darkest moments, inspiring those around us to do the best work they can, and creating a legacy that will be talked about for generations? Well, as it turns out the answer starts with a little thing we can all choose to do every day! How would you like people to remember you? What is the magic of leaving a lasting legacy? It doesn’t take money, power or expertise to make it happen. No—instead, the key to a legacy that will leave people smiling at your memory is free to us all and can be our ticket to mountains of success in our businesses and families! By Sam Burns Read Article

Embracing Holy Envy

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In 1985, Lutheran Bishop Krister Stendahl, in defending the building of a Mormon temple by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Stockholm, enunciated "Three Rules of Religious Understanding:" "When trying to understand another religion, you should ask the adherents of that religion and not its enemies."'Don't compare your best to their worst," and: "Leave room for holy envy." Stendahl challenges us to be open to recognizing elements in other religions--even those that may appear foreign or threatening--and to consider how we might wish to support, embrace, emulate or further explore those elements that might help us to deepen our understanding of our own religious traditions and more deeply connect to others: to embrace 'holy envy.' Read Article

Do Not Lose Heart -- We Were Made for These Times

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Clarissa Pinkola Estes stirringly invites us to embrace the moment we are in with all of its fear, uncertainty, and turmoil. She says, "I too have felt despair many times in my life, but I do not keep a chair for it...In any dark time, there is a tendency to veer toward fainting over how much is wrong or unmended in the world. Do not focus on that. Do not make yourself ill with overwhelm." This passage calls us to constructive action -- and recalls us to our deepest purpose. Read Article

The Longest Night

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Winter Solstice, the longest night of the year, has a parallel in the tale of days we call our lives. During a dark time it can be hard to remember the warmth and joy that also comes and goes. This lovely animated poem reminds us to keep taking one step at a time toward the coming light. Watch Video

Why Are So Many Female Doctors Burning Out?

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Research suggests that women physicians are more likely to burnout than men. How can we close that gap? By Jeremy Adam Smith At medical school, Beth Habeck discovered that men and women met different expectations—and tended to go in distinct directions. “For example, more men would pursue surgery,” she says. “If a woman did, that meant she wasn’t interested in having a family. Women would gravitate towards, say, dermatology, because with technological advancements, there were more opportunities to work at home.” Habeck (whose name has been changed) became an emergency-room physician, and she married a dermatologist. But when they had children, he didn’t take advantage of those opportunities for flexible work. Instead, he expected Habeck to take primary responsibility for the children and household. “I’d be up all night at work, and then I’d be up all night with the kids, because they were fussy, then I’d have to get up early to get them to preschool,” recalls Habeck. “I’

The Slow Joy of Jane Hirshfield’s Ledger

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"It's such a slow joy," says poet Jane Hirshfield, about the work of revising a poem. We've just left the trailhead for a hike on what she calls the "hem" of Mount Tamalpais. Already were deep in conversation about how Hirshfield produces the wise and tender poems that fill her nine poetry collections, including the newly-published Ledger. Read Article

20-Year Reforestation Project Plants 2.7 Million Trees

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"When celebrated Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado took over family land in the state of Minas Gerais, instead of the tropical paradise that he remembered as a child, he found the trees cut down and the wildlife gone. He was devastated. It was 1994 and he had just returned from a traumatic assignment reporting on the genocide in Rwanda. "The land was as sick as I was -- everything was destroyed," Salgado told The Guardian. "Only about 0.5% of the land was covered in trees." Salgado's wife, Lelia Deluiz Wanick Salgado, had the idea to replant the forest... Read Article

Bike Angels: Competitive Problem-Solving at Its Extreme!

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What happens when we use fun to inspire people to help the world in their own way? New York City tried out this experiment with their Citi Bike Bike Angels program and the results were, well, unexpectedly enthusiastic! Can we use games to solve big, real-life problems? New York City was up for the experiment! They created a city-wide hobby that some are calling a bit crazy—while others are seeing as a key way to better our own health and the planet’s! Their success makes us wonder: how else could we use fun to make the world a better place? By Liesl Ulrich-Verderber Read Article

The Wanderer: Earth as Art

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"There is this one extravaganza, already in production for five million years now, called Earth. Because it is so full of redundancies, so repetitious in its winters and fishes, we feel we have seen enough to get a handle on it; we would like to set out our critique of the planet's aesthetic merits and failures before we are toast like Tacitus. There was once a critique that it was "very good," but that was affectionate and antediluvian; it is high time for a dispassionate reassessment of Earth as art." Amy Leach takes the reader on this dazzling, tongue-in-cheek, magic carpet ride of a piece. Read Article

Stories of Kindness from Wuhan

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"I want to dedicate a thread to regular Chinese people who stepped up to fill in the gaps, helping fellow citizens in this fight against the #coronavirus. These stories dont make international headlines. But they are still important." A journalist at qz shares stories of ordinary people and their extraordinary acts of humanity. Read Article