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Showing posts from November 3, 2019

What Can Parents Do About Bullying?

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Parents can take steps to help prevent bullying and to intervene when it happens.

By Diana Divecha


When we parents offer our children out to the wider world, we hope that wonderful experiences and people await them. But that isn’t always the case, of course. We can be dismayed to find our children involved in bullying—either as the perpetrator or on the receiving end.

As a developmental psychologist who has studied school-based bullying, I have counseled many families experiencing bullying, and I know it is not easy. We cannot completely control what difficulties our children will face in the world, but we can exert some influence over the paths they take and how they will respond to the people and events they encounter. When it comes to peer bullying, parents can help in a number of ways.

To maximize the chance they will avoid bullying situations in the first place, we can nurture children’s emotional and interpersonal skills, and support their positive peer relationships. If bullying do…

How an Unfair Division of Labor Hurts Your Relationship

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Inequality in a couple can impact everyone's happiness.

By Jill Suttie


Like many people my age, I had a father who went to work every day and a mom who stayed home—a traditional arrangement. My mom raised the kids, cleaned house, and handled all the family social arrangements; my dad was the breadwinner for the family.

These days, this division of labor is less common—at least in some countries. Since 1970, the percentage of families in the United States where both parents work has increased from 49 percent to 66 percent, with a 20 percent drop in the number of households where only the father works. European countries, too, have seen increasing trends toward dual-income households, as has Japan.

As women have entered the workforce in increasing numbers, this change has wrought both increased power for women and growing pains for dual-income couples. Instead of having a designated “admin” coordinator at home, as wives once were, many working couples must negotiate splitting up househ…

Agnes Binagwaho: A Doctor with Sassitude

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"Years before she became the health minister of Rwanda, Agnes Binagwaho tried to lock a fellow pediatrician in a hospital room. She saw a doctor in an examining room with a mother who held her sick daughter in her arms. And he was asleep. Binagwaho was appalled. She examined the girl herself in a separate room and then asked a nurse to shut the door on the doctor, who wouldn't be able to get out without the nurse's key. The medical staff wasn't too pleased. "They found me more guilty for trying to close him in that room for the night than him for mistreating the kid who could have died," she says. Throughout her life, Binagwaho affectionately called "Dr. Agnes" by colleagues has been unafraid to defy authority by speaking her mind. In the process, she has helped to transform Rwanda's health system." This NPR story shares more.


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What Would Nelson Mandela Do?

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"As one of the worlds most famous moral leaders, Nelson Mandelas larger-than-life struggle against apartheid inspired many of us, but it was something he said inside a Johannesburg office in 2005 that has always stayed with me.

At the time, the organization that I had co-founded, Keystone Accountability, was less than two years old. The Nelson Mandela Foundation was a founding partner, and I was meeting with the foundations Executive Director John Samuel."David Bonbright shares more...


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The Case for Taking More Naps!

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Busy schedule got you stressin’? Here are easy ways you can bring more simplicity to your life!

How do we avoid burnout and the stress that comes with a full schedule? Well, it may come down to weeding out a few extra pieces and adding in a whole lot more naps!

By Sam Burns


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Bending the Arc: A Friendship that Changed the World

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A fledgling group of unstoppable health advocates took on a seemingly impossible mission: global health equity. Harvard medical student Paul Farmer, idealistic physician Jim Yong Kim, and activist Ophelia Dahl successfully raised funding and opened a clinic in 1980s Haiti. Through cultural sensitivity, listening skills, local partnerships, and home visits, the revolutionary Partners In Health was born.


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One Key to Being Happy When You’re Single

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A new study shows how important social connections are for single people.

By James McConchie


Significant changes have been taking place within the institution of marriage over the last couple of decades. People are getting married later. More people are actively choosing not to get married. It is more common for people to have children without getting married.

But how is this affecting our well-being?

To start to examine that question, a recent study in Applied Research in Quality of Life compared the behaviors and the happiness of married and unmarried people. It found that unmarried people have a unique advantage: They are more active socially, which means they’re sometimes even happier than their married counterparts.

Researcher Elyakim Kislev looked at surveys administered in 32 European countries between 2002 and 2016. People reported on their marital status, as well as their social capital—the amount of social activities and social interactions they engaged in. In the survey, social…

A Museum of What New Yorkers Throw Out Every Day

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Tucked away inside an NYC garage sits a museum of all the treasures thrown in the trash every day. Let’s meet the man behind this bootstrap collection and the insight he has for us all!

Hidden away in a garage in New York City sits a museum of the human experience. Among its over 45,000 specimens sit letters from the White House, walls of Furbies, carefully organized doorknobs, bins of family photographs, and thousand-dollar teddy bears. So, what connects these seemingly random items?

By Sam Burns


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How Oral Surgery Taught Me a Lesson in Wholeness

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Andy Smallman created an "Anonymous Kindness" class some years back, suggesting each participant offer an anonymous kindness act toward someone each week. Recently he met with an anonymous act of kindness toward him: an organ donor's bone to fill a hole in his mouth after oral surgery. Whose bone was it? he asked himself, and came up with a new answer "ours."


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