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Showing posts from May 15, 2016

Daily Inspirational Quote - May 21, 2016

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“Wake up with determination. Go to bed with satisfaction.”

Personally I wake up every morning thankful for actually waking up! Joking aside, how many of us wake up and spend a minute or two thinking about the day ahead with something less than anticipation? From today, when you wake up, try to picture your day ahead and feel determined to get the very best out of the whole day you can! This should find you starting your day with anticipation and an eagerness that will carry you through the following hours and bring, not only to you, but to the people you encounter and interact with, a sense of wellbeing, cheerfulness and positive energy. So, by the time you climb back into bed and snuggle down you fall asleep with a smile on your face in anticipation of the next day being much the same.

by CathiBew.co.uk

Smart By Nature: Schooling for Sustainability

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"There is a bold new movement underway in school systems across North America and around the world. Educators, parents, and students are remaking K-12 education to prepare students for the environmental challenges of the coming decades. They are discovering that guidance for living abundantly on a finite planet lies, literally, under their feet and all around them -- in living soil, food webs and water cycles, energy from the sun, and everywhere that nature reveals her ways. Smart by Nature schooling draws on 3.8 billion years of natural research and development to find solutions to problems of sustainable living, make teaching and learning more meaningful, and create a more hopeful future for people and communities." Read on to learn more about School by Nature's efforts to inspire tomorrow's leaders and innovators.

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1294/smart-by-nature-schooling-for-sustainability-michael-k-stone-zenobia-barlow/

Hero Teacher Killed While Saving Pregnant Woman During Massachusetts Mall Stabbing

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Last Tuesday, when a crazed man began stabbing a waitress inside a Bertucci's Restaurant housed in a shopping mall Taunton, Massachusetts, 56-year-old George Heath didn't have time to think. Instead, the beloved teacher and avid windsurfer sprung into action, charging the suspect, grabbing him around the waist, and thwarting his relentless attempts to stab anyone within arm's reach.

While struggling with the knife-wielding man, who police later shot dead and identified as 28-year-old Arthur DaRosa, George was stabbed in the head. He died soon after arriving at an area hospital for treatment, according to his wife, Rosemary Heath, who spoke to PEOPLE Tuesday morning – one week after witnessing her husband's heroism and death.

"After he was stabbed, he paused for a moment, and fell to the floor," Rosemary tells PEOPLE. "I heard the off-duty cop" – who ultimately shot and killed DaRosa – "yelling, 'Drop your weapon,' so I knew I could bend…

Living with a Purpose Changes Everything

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ByJill Suttie

According to a new book, having a purpose in life is crucial for our health and well-being.


Victor Strecher, a behavioral scientist at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, lost his 19-year-old daughter to a sudden heart attack in 2010. Her fragility and eventual death upended his thoughts on what life should be about and how to live it—and he was moved to write a book calledLife on Purpose.  The book is first and foremost inspirational, focused on how the role of purpose in happiness and wellbeing has been debated by philosophers and discovered by individuals. It includes both Strecher’s personal revelations and those of others who’ve found purpose and changed the trajectory of their lives. But the book is also a review on the science of purpose, which has blossomed in recent years. According to Strecher, the strength of one’s life purpose—which involves a combination of living according to your values and goals, and desiring to make a positive difference in…

Daily Inspirational Quote - May 20, 2016

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“Transformation happens on the other side of surrender."

We have all struggled with problems in the past and, most of the time, done our utmost to find a solution, a way to move forward and leave whatever it is behind. However, occasionally, very occasionally, there are times when we should just say, “You know what, I give up. That’s it. I can do no more.” At those times perhaps that’s the way we’re meant to react to whatever, or whoever, is causing us a problem. By admitting and accepting that we don’t know the best way forward, can actually let the dust settle, so to speak, and we are then ready to be transformed into the person who just let’s things happen and trust that what follows is for the best.

by CathiBew.co.uk

The Art of Medicine: W.H Auden & Oliver Sachs

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"The poetry of W.H. Auden was among Oliver Sacks's formative books. When the two men eventually became friends in the final years of Auden's life, Dr. Sacks was still a thirty-something neurologist with little more than a weightlifting record under his belt, a long way from becoming the Dante of medicine. Auden became an invaluable mentor as the young writer was honing the singular voice that would later render him the greatest science-storyteller of our time." Maria Popova shares more.

http://www.dailygood.org/story/1293/the-art-of-medicine-w-h-auden-on-what-makes-a-great-physician-maria-popova/

Measuring Compassion in the Body

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ByEmiliana R. Simon-Thomas

What happens in Vagus… may make or break compassion.


Is there a biological fingerprint for compassion? Two scientific teams,one led by Zoe Taylorat Purdue and theother by Jenny Stellarat UC Berkeley, have found that the answer may lie in the Vagus nerve. That’s the cranial nerve in the body with the widest reach, influencing speech, head positioning, digestion, and—importantly for these two studies—the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system’s influence on the heart. Students typically memorize the parasympathetic branch (PNS) as the “rest and digest” branch of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which controls bodily functions that we’re not aware of when we’re relaxed and feeling content. The PNS is also called the “feed and breed” branch—and recently, social psychologistBarbara Fredricksonadded the label “tend and befriend” to the PNS, suggesting that it also supports functions that enable social engagement and nurturing behaviors. These functio…

How Love Grows in Your Body

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ByJeremy Adam Smith

Here are the places where romantic love abides in our bodies—and the role each one plays in sustaining love over time.


“Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds,” wrote William Shakespeare in his116th Sonnet. “O no! it is an ever-fixed mark that looks on tempests and is never shaken.” Nothing could be further from the truth, says the new science of romantic love. Love is, first and foremost, an emotion—but one that is, more than most emotions, rooted in our bodies and in the ways our bodies age together. I’m not just referring to the vagaries of lust, though that can lead to romantic love. As love grows and deepens, it lights up some parts of our nervous system and dims others. The importance of feel-good hormones like serotonin and dopamine may decline over the course of a relationship—but a love that reaches maturity will bind the lovers on a neurological level. Far from an “an ever-fixed mark,” love is a process subject to biological forces beyond our c…

Where to Find Wisdom in the Body

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ByJill Suttie

According to a new study, people with higher heart rate variability are wiser—when they make an effort to be objective.


Many cultures consider the human heart to be the seat of wisdom. Now scientists are finding some evidence for this, though the reality may be more complicated than it seems. Previous researchhas suggested that higher heart rate variability (HRV)—the variability in the time between our heartbeats, which is a measure of heart health—is associated with better cognitive and emotional functioning. For example, higher HRV has been linked to better working memory and attention, higher levels ofempathy and social functioning, andbetter emotional self-control. Could heart rate variability be linked to better moral judgments, as well? Researcher Igor Grossmann from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, and his colleagues at the University of Western Sydney in Australia, looked at how HRV interacts with moral reasoning and judgment—or wisdom—in a series of experiments. …